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Lulin Serama

"Quality Begets Quality"

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The ABA (American Bantam Association) posts the ideal as
16oz for males- 20% over or under
& 14oz for hens- 20% over or under

  YOUNGSTERS:
Cockerels – One Class Only                     Pullets – One Class Only
Up to 16 oz (500 gm)                                 Up to 14 ounces (425 gm)
ASA Table Top Judging Scoring Card
Type - 30 points or 30% of total
Character - 25 points or 25% of total
Tail Carriage - 15 points or 15% of total
Wing Carriage - 10 points or 10% of total
Feather Quality - 10 points or 10% of total
Condition - 10 Points or 10%  of total
Total Possible Points:  100 pts. = 100%


Scroll down for ABA and ASA Standards of Perfection
Shape of Male

Comb: Single, medium, set firmly and evenly on head, straight and upright, evenly serrated with five regular and distinct points, the middle points the same length as the width of the blade, moderately arched, blade should extend well over back of head.

Beak: Strong, stout and well curved.

Face: Small, rounded, smooth, fine in texture, free from wrinkle or folds.

Eyes: Round, conspicuous.

Wattles: Medium, round, fine in texture, free from wrinkles or folds.

Ear Lobes: Small, oval, fitting closely to head.

Head: Small, carried well back in a proud manner.

Neck: Medium length, backward arched, showing off breast, full, tapering gracefully from shoulders to head.

Hackle: Abundant, flowing naturally from front of neck reaching far back covering both shoulders.

Back: Short, broad, in profile, shaped like a 'V' with neck and tail forming the vertical sides.

Tail Coverts & Saddle: Slightly curved, sword shaped hanging over the abdomen and covering back, widely spread, overlapping the tail and lesser sickles.

Tail: Moderately large and upright, carried in an upright position so as to almost contact the back of head.

Main Tail: Feathers wide, moderately spread in a neatly overlapping manner, rising above the head, “A” shaped from the rear view.

Main Sickles: Medium to long, strong, firm, broad sword-shaped slightly curved.

Lesser Sickles: Well-spread, medium length slightly upright, sword-shaped sickle feathers covered with coverts.

Coverts: Abundant, becoming very broad, flowing well up tail.

Wings: Large, long, closely folded, carried vertically not quite touching the ground, Shoulders and Fronts: Prominent, slightly concealed by hackle.

Bows: Well rounded.

Coverts: Feathers broad, forming two distinct bars across wings.

Primaries: Moderate width, rather long, completely concealed by secondaries.

Secondaries: Broad, tapering convexly to rear, wing bay well exposed.

Breast: Highly lifted, well developed, full, carried prominently forward beyond the vertical line drawn from point of beak, broad and well rounded, from head to neck to breast – S shaped profile.

Body & Stern: Body- short, good depth and width, sloping from front to rear. Stern: Fluff, short, abundant.

Legs & Toes: Legs- average length, widely set, parallel to each other without bowing or knocked knees, well proportioned.

Lower Thighs: Medium, stout at top and tapering to hocks.

Shanks: Medium, smooth, round, evenly scaled.

Toes: Four, straight, well and evenly spread, evenly scaled.

Appearance: Small, broad, compact, active, tame, standing up majestically.

by Catherine Stanevich
Shape of Female

Comb: Single, small, set firmly and evenly on the head, straight and upright, evenly serrated with five regular and distinct points, the middle points the same length as the width of the blade, moderately arched, blade should extend well over the back of the head.

Beak: Strong, stout, and well curved.

Face: Small, rounded, smooth, fine in texture, free from wrinkle or folds.

Eyes: Round, conspicuous.

Wattles: Small, round, fine in texture, free from wrinkles or folds.

Ear Lobes: Small, oval, fitting closely to head.

Head: Small, carried well back in proud manner.

Neck: Medium length, backward arched showing off breast, full, tapering gracefully from shoulders to head.

Hackle: Abundant, flowing naturally from front of neck reaching far back covering both shoulders.

Back: Short, broad, in profile, shaped like a V with neck and tail forming the vertical sides.

Cushion: Short, feathers broad and plentiful.

Tail: Moderately large and upright, carried in an upright position so as to almost contact the back of head.

Main Tail: Feathers wide, moderately spread in a neatly overlapping manner, rising above the head, “A” shaped from the rear view.

Coverts: Abundant, becoming very broad, flowing well up tail.

Wings: Large, long, closely folded, carried vertically not quite touching the ground, Shoulders and Fronts: Prominent, slightly concealed by hackle.

Bows: Well rounded.

Coverts: Feathers broad, forming two distinct bars across wings.

Primaries: Moderate width, rather long, completely concealed by secondaries.

Secondaries: Broad, tapering convexly to rear, wing bay well exposed.

Breast: Highly lifted, well developed, full, carried prominently forward beyond vertical line drawn from point of beak, broad and well rounded, from head to neck to breast – S shaped profile.

Body & Stern: Body- short, good depth and width, sloping from front to rear. Stern: Fluff, short, abundant.

Legs & Toes: Legs- average length -- widely set, parallel to each other without bowing or knock ed knees, well proportioned.

Lower Thighs: Medium, stout at top and tapering to hocks.

Shanks: Medium, smooth, round, evenly scaled.

Toes: Four, straight, well and evenly spread, evenly scaled.

Appearance: Small, broad, compact, active, tame, standing up majestically
 
.
by Catherine Stanevich

These drawings shows the ideal form of the American Serama male and female. They represent the type breeders should consider as their main goal and what they should be working towards. " Please try to understand that this is a goal.  There is no perfect American Serama.  We all try our best to better the breed at all times.      Lulin"
   
American Bantam Association
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